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Discussion Starter #1
It's been a while since I posted but I was wondering if any gear heads on here have changed their own spark plugs on their Caliber? Is it too tight to do? Is it worth paying 95$ to have the dealership do? Or can I do it myself? If it is a diy type of project is there anything that I should know to make it easier?
Thanks in advance
 

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95$ to change them??

At that price, go get yourself a nice torque wrench and do it yourself. If you're an idiot, you're qualified to do it!
 

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Mouser it wasn't a question of how easy it is to change spark plugs but with front wheel drive cars these days there is no room to maneuver...My question was just was there something in the way that made it not worth changing them myself
 

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Discussion Starter #5
P.S. that pdf is awesome, so if i'm looking at it right they are right on top? Easy squeezy lemon peasy
 

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yes, right on the top, remove the engine cover by lifting straight up. You will see the 4 coil packs on the engine each being held down by a single torx screw (thx Prop1) T-20 I believe. Remove the screws and carefully pull the coil pack out. The plugs are set a little deep so you might need an extension for your plug socket. 20 min being careful sounds about right..don't crosssthread the plugs!!

rmurad38
 

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It's only one torx screw holding the coil. I also didn't bother with disconnecting the battery. There's no power to the coils anyways, so it's a waste of time. Don't forget to smear a thin layer of anti-seize on the plug threads.
 

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Ditto on what Brad said. I changed mine at 30,000 miles and have to say it's the easiest set of plugs I've ever changed on a vehicle. And I've owned a lot of vehicles over the past 38 years. I used a spark plug socket with the rubber insert to avoid the plug falling out as I installed them. Along with a 12" extension on a 3/8" ratchet.
 

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It's a pretty similar setup on my Neon, just no coil over plug. I haven't needed to change the plugs on it, but the next time I change a set of plugs on the Neon or Caliber I'm going to use a piece of rubber hose to start the plugs, then use a regular socket to tighten. I generally have to pull the spark plug socket out of the tube with a pair of needle nose pliars.
 

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Or you could go get yourself a proper spark plug socket that has the rubber insert in it. It is in there for a couple of reasons. One, being to hold the plug in the socket if you have where you cant get your fingers in to start it by hand, which we do and Two is to protect the ceramic part of the plug. If you use a regular socket you run the risk of the socket possible slipping and you snapping the ceramic part off of your spark plug. Been there done that on the first set of plugs i ever changed on my first car back in 84 (Mustang Pace Car with a 302 V-8) . These plugs are a breeze to do and one other thing to remember is to make sure the engine is cold.. I generally tend to let mine sit over night before i do a plug change. Dont want to cross thread and strip an aluminum head.
 

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I use the rubber inserts in my spark plug sockets. I changed my spark plugs 5 or 6 times last year, doing my spark plug test. Always........Always put a little high temperature anti-seize on the threads of the plugs. I have a can of it, but they sell small packets of it (anti-seize) near the cash register at most of the car parts stores for around 1 dollar.
 

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I dont know anything really about cars... how often are we suppose to replace the Caliber spark plugs?...... I have 34,000 kms (21,126 miles)......
 

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When they do not work !
Otherwise it's on your maintenance service schedule 30,000 miles.
 

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ok. if i took them longer than the 50,000 would I be damaging the car?
 

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ok. if i took them longer than the 50,000 would I be damaging the car?
Not necessarily, but your fuel economy will probably suffer, and you may get a carbon buildup in the cylinder walls. When I changed mine at 33,000, the gap had widened to .048 from the spec of .043. Some cars have spark plugs rated for 100,000 miles, but not the Caliber's.
 

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Super simple just remove the cover and BAM!!!!!!! it took me 10 minutes Only if you have never touched a car it would be hard.Its my first front wheel drive car ever,so I had no idea but you know what I did?I popped the hood and looked I wonder why people don't do that before asking???I just saying
 

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Super simple just remove the cover and BAM!!!!!!! it took me 10 minutes Only if you have never touched a car it would be hard.Its my first front wheel drive car ever,so I had no idea but you know what I did?I popped the hood and looked I wonder why people don't do that before asking???I just saying

I did pop and look...But I didn't take off the cover because I didn't expect them to be there...Used to working on my 68 chevy truck, so I was looking (trying to anyway, it's a tight fit) on the sides of the engine block (front and back), It looked like it could be a pain if the plugs were there so I came on here and asked, I don't have to reinvent the wheel if someone has done it already.
 

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Or you could go get yourself a proper spark plug socket that has the rubber insert in it. It is in there for a couple of reasons. One, being to hold the plug in the socket if you have where you cant get your fingers in to start it by hand, which we do and Two is to protect the ceramic part of the plug. If you use a regular socket you run the risk of the socket possible slipping and you snapping the ceramic part off of your spark plug. Been there done that on the first set of plugs i ever changed on my first car back in 84 (Mustang Pace Car with a 302 V-8) . These plugs are a breeze to do and one other thing to remember is to make sure the engine is cold.. I generally tend to let mine sit over night before i do a plug change. Dont want to cross thread and strip an aluminum head.
Every single set of plugs I have put in my Neon have received a final torquing (yes, I torque my plugs because I'm scared of overtightening. I've never had a good feeling for torque) with a standard deep socket. The rubber insert on my spark plug socket is a little too tight so the socket always gets stuck in the tube and then I have to fish it out with a pair of needle nose pliars. Thus the use of a rubber hose on the next go 'round.

To date, I have never broke a spark plug.
 

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The rubber insert on my spark plug socket is a little too tight so the socket always gets stuck in the tube and then I have to fish it out with a pair of needle nose pliars.
That's why I always use some electrical tape and wrap it around the socket and extension shaft so they don't separate.;)
 
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