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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone make a rear discbrake conversion for a 07 sxt?
 

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Short answer - No

There are major changes, both to the service brake and parking brake required, plus a different proportioning valve for standard brakes or a different program for ABS.

I have no issues with my rear drums, why do you think they should be changed to discs?

On an SXT, it just does not make technical or economic sense.
 

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I'll add to that, that the rear brakes only do 30% of the stopping. If you want to stop faster, just put some high quality disc brake pads and rotors on the front. It will definitely be easier and cheaper.
 

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by the way I got some rotors that I need to get rid of them.. I totaled my car and never put them on If anyone needs them Im giving them away cheap. Including the breakpads...
 

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Actually, the best way to shorten stopping distance is high quality tires.
Even base model brakes can easily lock up on cheap (like the OEM Firestone) tires.

Good tires also give you the advantage better starting and steering traction.

Better brakes can only help with stopping on clean dry pavement.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
by the way I got some rotors that I need to get rid of them.. I totaled my car and never put them on If anyone needs them Im giving them away cheap. Including the breakpads...
What kind and PM me with a price



I just wanted the look to spice up the car.
 

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I can't imagine Dodge would have changed much between the mounting brackets for both drums and disks. It just doesn't make sense to change the brackets mounted to the rear suspension for those two types of brakes as the same "backing plate" mount can technically be used easily for both if a caliper mounting bracket is designed to work with the drum backing plate mount. To be honest, its simple engineering, not to mention it makes sense to use the same mounting plates on the rear end between the two setups from a cost standpoint.

On another note, besides the appearance factor of disk rear brakes, there is absolutely no benefit. Depending on setup, rear drums actually stop faster in some cases where drums and disks are available on the same vehicle. Drums have unfortunately gotten the stigma that they don't stop as well, which is quite the opposite than what actually happens in regular day to day driving. There is a reason big rigs still use drum brakes... On the flip side, drums will overheat MUCH faster than disks when used for auto racing, making them less desirable for such an application.

So, unless you have flashy wheels with open spokes, there is absolutely no benefit to disk brakes on the rear, even with the occasional track day. Who knows, you may actually perform better on a track than an identical car with rear disks.
 

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When discs are wet drums might even bite quicker.
 

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Drums and disks react roughly the same to water in my experience. I had one car about 8 years ago that would loose the rear brakes just about if the roads were decently wet. They were drums.
 

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The biggest problem with drum brakes (IMO) is debris removal. Disc brakes tend to "clean" themselves as you apply the brakes. The brake pads act like a squege, removing dirt and road debris. Drum braks have a backing plate, but when (and I say when because crap WILL get in there) debris gets past that backing it's far more likley to get wedged between the drum and the brake shoe. Even if stuff does get thrown behind the break shoe, it still has great odds of bouncing around back between the shoe and the drum.

I see this crap everyday at work... But this is nowhere near as big as I seemed to make it. Even disc brakes have a small posibility of getting debris between the pad and the rotor, but on a disc brake that debris can also fall out onto the ground, not potentially get trapped in a drum...

EDIT: Another big reason dics are preferred over drums for racing is brake release. Drum brakes (especially older drum brakes) could develop a habit of sticking to the drum for a moment after the brakes were released.
 

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Now, from an engineer's perspective:

Both types of brakes can be equally effective.
Yes - drums can trap debris, and discs are practically self cleaning.
Both types have their share of problems, albeit different, but problems, nonetheless.
Discs tend to be simpler and less costly to make, Discs are also easier to inspect and service.
Pretty much six of one and half a dozen of the other, but due to the simpler mechanism, discs are typically the brake of choice nowadays.
 

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Don't kid yourself discs are far superior to drum in brake fade resistance, total swept area, brake adjustment and clamping force on the rotor.
The rear drum is 9.0" x .85" and has a swept area of 78 sq. inches the rear rotor is 10.3" x 1.39" and a swept area of 138 sq. inches.

I've done 2 SRT-4 rear disc conversion on my 05 Neons and it's not that difficult and neither the prop valve or MC needed to be replaced.

If you don't have ABS the go to a bone yard and get the entire rear disc setup from a Cailber/Patriot/Compass or Avenger/Sebring but you'll need the Caliber e-brake cables though if go this way.
Get all the rear brake parts...backing plate, caliper adapter, rotor, caliper, brake lines, e-brake cables, e-brake shoes and e-brake parts.

Check out this how-to for a Neon rear disc conversion. http://forum.2gn.org/viewtopic.php?t=8325
 

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Got a write up and pictures? wouldnt mind doing it myself one day
I can take picture of the underside. make sure you get the flex from the caliper to the steel line and the steel line. I got them from the wreckers here for 25 a side with the calipers and brackets.
 
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