Dodge Caliber Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Remove the LED bulbs and put the halogens back in. Then disconnect both battery cables and tie them together for 15 minutes or so to ensure a complete de-powering of all electronics in the car. Reconnect the battery, then see what happens.

The TIPM is sensitive to any kind of electrical modifications and will do all sorts of funky things when it sees an anomaly like the headlight bulbs drawing more or less current than they should. Assuming you didn't fry the TIPM and the LED bulbs are the culprit, the power reset should get you up and running again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Something has to be causing the fuse to blow...the fact that it apparently doesn't immediately blow when you start the car suggests it may not actually be a short to ground but a bad component on the circuit protected by fuse #33. First thing is to verify you have the correct amperage fuse in the #33 position...we often overlook the simplest answers. :)

If that's not it, then the best way to troubleshoot this is to use an amp clamp to measure the amount of current being drawn by the circuit. If it's immediately more than the fuse's rating then yeah, it's almost certainly a short. But if the initial current draw is "reasonable" but at some point it rises above the fuse's rating, then one of the devices on that circuit could be faulty...maybe something like an internal short. Identify the components on that circuit and check the wiring going to each for a fault. If you don't see anything you could try unplugging them one at a time and see if the current remains at a normal level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
I don't know for sure with FCA products what's necessary to replace a PCM. I do know with some manufacturers that you need to have an online account with their technical services to do this, and that's something you have to pay for. I seem to recall that it's possible to buy like a 3-day account from some manufacturers but obviously you need to have a scantool advanced enough to do this work.

Check out the South Main Auto channel on YouTube...it's a mechanic here in New York state that I follow who's exceptionally good. He's done several videos on replacing/reprogramming PCMs and ECMs and perhaps you can learn what you need to know there.

I'm pretty certain the ABS module needs to be programmed as well and while I'm not a mechanic I do know that ABS modules are crazy expensive and a challenge to replace for a number of reasons. I also know that when an ABS module fails the car will default over to standard non-ABS brakes and if your car has stability control you'll lose that as well, so the car can still potentially be driven daily without it. If the ABS module is on the circuit where the fuse is blowing, my thought would be to absolutely make sure the ABS module is faulty before replacing it. I should think you could use an amp clamp to monitor its power draw or a scantool with bidirectional controls that allows you to test/activate the module to see if doing so causes the fuse to blow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
In my Caliber that box only has 3 or or 4 relays in it...no maxi-fuses, but what's in your box depends a lot on the year of your car and what engine you have. I believe in mine 2 or 3 relays control the cooling fan and one is for the fuel pump. Corrosion of pins in the corner socket of that box with a resulting relay failure is a common problem.

Glad you found the culprit!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
I was curious so I looked up the specs for this relay/fuse box.

For diesel engines only, the 50A fuse is for your glow plug. The two 25A fuses are for the two cabin heater relays. Gas/petrol cars don't have any of these fuses.

Referencing your picture above, the three relays on the right are for the radiator cooling fan.

The left middle relay is the main relay that powers either the engine control module (for diesels) or the powertrain control module (for gas/petrol engines). For gas engines this relay also is responsible for providing power to the ignition coils and fuel injectors.


The top left socket is a spare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
According to the 2007 wiring diagrams I have, the main relay in that box provides power to, among other things, the fuse in the TIPM that powers the AC compressor.

Each 25A fuse in the box each provides power to a cabin heater relay (so there are 2 in total). These relays provide power to the electric cabin heater that diesels cars apparently have (and which gas engines don't need). The heater has two heating elements in it with the TIPM turning one or both on depending on alternator output. As such, it would seem that if one of these two circuits is bad (which seems to be the case since one fuse keeps blowing), it's not a big deal...you'll only get half the maximum amount of heat out of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Okay, using your image above as a reference and my 2007 wiring diagrams:

The 50A fuse on the left is your glow plug fuse.

The middle and right fuses are supposed to be 25A...each one controls one of the cabin heater circuits, each providing electrical power to half of the electric cabin heater.

Diesel engines produce far less heat than gasoline engines so Dodge added the electric cabin heater to supplement the heat coming from the engine. If you have sufficient cabin heat then fixing the blowing fuse is probably not necessary.

Again, this info comes from the 2007 Dodge shop manual. If Dodge modified the design of this circuit in later model year Calibers this info may not be 100% accurate for your car but it's what I have to work with. If it were my car I'd research why the right slot has a 50A fuse in it. If it SHOULD be a 25A fuse and you have a 50A fuse in there, you could start an electrical fire.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top