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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/news/8363561/Bristol-Cars-the-British-motoring-institution-goes-into-administration.html

Their Fighter model used the Viper SRT10 engine, top speed more than 200mph, 0 to 60mph in less than four seconds. The Fighter T with a twin-turbocharged V10 engine producing 1,012bhp and 1,036 lb ft of torque has top speed electronically limited to 225mph, although Bristol stated that the theoretical maximum was more like 270mph


In the firm's heyday, it was making around 200 cars a year and had a waiting list of 18 months. Bristol has won class and team awards at Le Mans in the Fifties. In 1980 it introduced the UK's first turbocharged car – the Bristol Beaufighter. In 60 years the firm has built only 8,016 cars.

Bristol Cars was founded in 1946 when the Bristol Aeroplane Company teamed up with AFN (makers of Frazer Nash cars), and has maintained a single showroom on Kensington High Street, London ever since. It has rarely released any sales figures and consistently denied the media opportunities to test drive its cars.

Bristol originally used BMW engines, but it has had a 45-year association with the US Chrysler marque.

The current Bristol Cars line-up consists of the Fighter, Blenheim, Blenheim Speedster and Series 6.

Among those made redundant was Syd Lovesy, 91, the works director.

Tony Crook, the former RAF pilot and Grand Prix driver who was the owner for decades, allegedly insisted on personally vetting all potential Bristol buyers to ensure they were the right sort of person. A Bristol is a very safe car, we've only lost three owners in 60 years and one of them drove off a precipice.

To own a Bristol Car was to drive a "Gentleman's Express", a luxury vehicle for the discerning wealthy who wouldn't be seen in anything quite so ostentatious as a Rolls-Royce or Bentley.

The Bristol 411 Series 6 was produced between 1969 and 1976 and used a 6,227cc Chrysler V8 engine >


 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
The headline was misleading, Morgan are still British

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekRzYGGJ8z0 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYH6ip1uY9I&feature=related

The Morgan Motor Company is a British motor car manufacturer founded in 1910 by Harry Frederick Stanley Morgan, and run by him until he died, aged 77, in 1959. His son Peter Morgan ran the company until a few years before his death in 2003. The company is currently run by Charles Morgan, the son of Peter Morgan.

Morgan is based in Malvern Link, Worcestershire and employs 163 people. Morgan produced 640 cars in 2007. All the cars are assembled by hand. The waiting list for a car is approximately one to two years, although it has been as high as ten years in the past.

http://www.morgan-motor.co.uk/about_morgan/1910.html

The boss spotted her at the London Motor Show 2002 and married the Russian actress a year later

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm1660061440/nm2993799

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Another one goes

On May 16 2012, the legendary British race car maker Lola Cars announced it had filed for administration, citing the latest economic downturn as the main reason for this decision.

Among Lola's astonishing record of accomplishments are 181 individual Indy or Champ car victories, including three Indy 500s, as well as eleven CART or Champ Car titles and seven consecutive Formula 5000 and Can-Am championships between 1974-'80.

The news has saddened many involved in the motorsport scene, as the company has not only left a large impression on drivers but multiple manufacturers too.

Lola started all the way back in 1958 and has created racing cars for almost every formula of motorsport. It's enjoyed a large amount of success in various disciplines, including in Formula One and particularly in the Le Mans series.

The company has collaborated together with various car manufacturers over the decades, collaborating on various racing projects with mixed results.

Back in 1962 Broadley designed and built the sleek Lola GT and the design rights to the car were bought by Ford forming the basis of the legendary Ford GT40 and mk II and mk IV Le Mans cars. The income from Ford helped Broadley expand Lola into becoming a serious manufacturer of Group 7 or Can-Am cars and Formula 5000 cars.

Lola T90 was the car the Formula One world champion Graham Hill used to win the 1966 Indy 500.

Lola T70 raced in the Can-Am sports car series plus multiple endurance races including Le Mans. In 1969 it filled first and second place at the 24 Hours of Daytona.

The innovative T600 was introduced in 1981 and was the first GT race car to incorporate ground-effect aerodynamics to increase downforce for better handling.

Lola B08/80 won the championship title in 2010.

B09/60 was built by Lola in collaboration with Prodrive, another British racing car developer. Their work has competed in the LeMans LMP1 category under the Aston Martin brand, which the boss of Prodrive owns. The car has enjoyed success including the championship title in 2009.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lola_Cars

Lola succeeded in winning the largest-ever contract for single-seater racing cars in 2005, winning the contract for the A1 Grand Prix series. Lola built 50 identical Zytek V8-powered A1 Grand Prix cars which were leased to the national franchisees (although the teams' spare cars were recalled part-way through the 2005 season to be used for spare parts); development work on these is strictly prohibited. The cars are approximately at the F3000 level of technology and provide close, spectacular racing. The contract concerned the three first seasons of the racing series between 2005 and 2008.

The revived CanAm was a fading series which collapsed in 1986, prompting Lola to move its focus to CART and the Indianapolis 500 beginning in 1985. Once again, Lola showed its ability to succeed in all motorsports outside of Formula One, pushing March down to one team for the 1990 CART season, and out of the series altogether by 1991. Six years after its full-time entrance into Indycar racing, Lola triumphed at Indy again, as the winning car for Arie Luyendyk in the 1990 Indianapolis 500. The rivalry between Lola and Reynard continued in the United States as well as the European F3000 series. Reynard entered CART in 1994 and eventually almost completely displaced Lola from the market. By 1998 only the backmarker Davis Racing team was utilizing the Lola chassis, with Penske Racing using their own chassis, Newman/Haas Racing using the new Swift Chassis and all others running Reynards. However, when Penske Racing elected to abandon their proprietary chassis in 1999, they elected to run Lolas for the rest of that season, switching to Reynard for 2000 and 2001. Newman/Haas and Chip Ganassi Racing switched to Lolas in running the cars the following year. By 2001 the field was evenly split between the two cars. Reynard's financial trouble and the fact that many of the top teams running the Reynard switched to the Indy Racing League IndyCar Series in 2002 and 2003 meant that development on the Reynard largely ceased, and by 2003 Lola was the only remaining manufacturer building new chassis for the Champ Car series. For the 2007 season, Champ Car switched to a spec Panoz chassis, the DP01, as its new chassis used by all competitors. The previous Lola, the B03/00, had been in the series since the 2003 season.

Lola also produced the spec chassis for the CART Indy Lights developmental series that was used from 1993 to 2001, replacing the previous car that was essentially a modified March 85B Formula 3000 car.

Al Unser Sr. won the 1978 Indianapolis 500 in this Lola T500-Cosworth


The Lola marque survived and thrived while many other well-known English production racing car constructors like March, Ralt and Reynard came and went after relatively short, sometimes fitful lives.
 

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Morgan may soon have a problem . The frames for the cars are made of wood from the Ash tree. The world is going through an Ash wilt/ fungus epedemic at the moment so Ash tree may soon no longer be with us . Not sure what wood can replace the strength /flexibility of Ash ---probably fibre glass ( Oh No )
 
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