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So i just sold my 05 srt-4 :Racing: and got an 08 RT caliber...yea. anyway the black plastic triangles on the front doors rattle with the bass of the car and i cant get them to stop. its so aggravating. i searched it up and got nothing, wondering if anyone has a fix for this annoyance
 

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You can try deadener or close cell foam. Pop them off, tight down the clips, and fill them up with something that has a lower resonant frequency than a piece of thin plastic.
 

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You can try deadener or close cell foam. Pop them off, tight down the clips, and fill them up with something that has a lower resonant frequency than a piece of thin plastic.
actually, I think you mean higher damping.
 

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How does it do that?..........
Whoops. Got my sentence backwards. The flimsier an object is the lower its resonant frequency. The more sturdy the higher its resonant frequency.
 

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Whoops. Got my sentence backwards. The flimsier an object is the lower its resonant frequency. The more sturdy the higher its resonant frequency.
Typically - yes, also the size and shape play a big part too.

It' adds more mass? Only think I can think of. I pulled mine of and stuffed some foam in there and it seems to have worked thus far.
No - damping material absorbs energy and stops the resonating object from vibrating.

Adding more mass (all other things being equal) will cause the resonating object to vibrate more strongly and usually at a lower frequency.
 

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A true deadener works in two ways. First it has a butyl adhesive and an aluminum outer layer. The butyl adhesive expands from vibrations and turns the vibrations into heat that are expelled through the aluminum layer. Second it adds mass causing less vibrations at a specific frequency. General rule of thumb is 25% coverage is all that is needed for a flat panel. Rigid panels or those with braces require less.
 

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A true deadener works in two ways. First it has a butyl adhesive and an aluminum outer layer. The butyl adhesive expands from vibrations and turns the vibrations into heat that are expelled through the aluminum layer. Second it adds mass causing less vibrations at a specific frequency. General rule of thumb is 25% coverage is all that is needed for a flat panel. Rigid panels or those with braces require less.
Converting vibrations to heat - absorbing energy - Damping

Adding mass, yes - will require more energy to to get the oscillations going, but might lower the resonant frequency.

The deadener probably also adds stiffness, might raise the resonant frequency.

All in all, if you absorb energy and shift the resonant frequency of the panel away from the exciting frequency - no more annoying vibration.
 
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