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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone

A while back I saw and was discussing the TIPM and whether there actually were "No User Serviceable Parts Inside". Had some time over the weekend and figured I would crack one open and see.
Not bad, surface mount for the most part, multi layer boards, and the dreaded epoxy coating, in this case clear and not totally solid, almost rubber like, you can actually read the values of caps/resistors/diodes and IC's, worse than the black coating cause you can actually see whats going on, but not touch!! Definately serviceable parts inside, but....
the epoxy makes it very, very difficult to 1:- probe the traces and components, it goes opaque when poked which obscures everything and, 2: access the solder points to repair or replace components, this coating will sometimes pull the SMD's along with the foil right off the board when you try to remove it, leaving a big mess, and several hours of USB microscope work.
PLus there seems to be some proprietary chips which I couldn't cross reference, someone makes it, just marked in Dodge specific numbers, with a schematic the chip could be found. If I had the time(only had a 3 hour window to open it up and have the car back on the road) I could trace back from the connectors and figure out what it each chip should be doing, again very long process.
So the TIPM is definately a serviceable unit, but time wise not very effective

will edit this post and insert pics tommorow
 

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Sounds like you're describing the inside of the PCM. The TIPM has fuses and computer controlled relays. None of the hardcore electronics you are describing.
 

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The TIPM:
(Front)


and (the rear):
 

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Yes - definitely would be interesting to see some photos.
Actually, the TIPM does have a lot of transistors and IC's in it. Most of the lower current loads are switched by transistors. All loads are electronically monitored.
Epoxy sealed - clear epoxy - reminds me of the innards of the old Ford "Don't Let Me Down" ignition modules. You could see the blown output transistor (a naked chip) under the epoxy - but could do nothing to replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi
Sorry for the delay, the pics will show all, will post after work. The fuse holders are actually nothing more than aluminum fins from the circuit board that fit in the underside of TIPM fuse side that is pictured above, all the connectors that run off the bottom are exactly the same and off the same circuit board.
 

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If I had the time(only had a 3 hour window to open it up and have the car back on the road)
Hope this was not a customer servicing vehicle :)
 

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THANK YOU! THANK YOU! I also have TIPM laying in my trunk (wishermotor was making problems as some of the buddy's here might remember), but I still did not had the time to open it. If you could get a couple of photos that would be very nice..

Btw. I found today again on one european webpage selling a TIPM as "fuse box", for just around 100$ for a CRD. :) Some guys just don't understand what this "fuse box" really is. :)

BR

Refik
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
TIPM Pics

Hey everyone
Here's da pics
No it is my wifes car, she trusts me with her car and my surface mount station, on this particular vehicle I have replced everything that bolts onto the frame, most power window switches, the heater/AC control(again proprietary chips that I can't spec-out and replace, rear wiper motor, and completely changed the wiring harness to a custom hand installed masterpiece that took 6.5 hours and so far has worked flawlessly, no bends over metal, or exposed wires in wheel wells, or multiple ground or power connections, all home runs from this lovely TIPM to where they need to go. If I really had to I would map out the TIPM, but as mentioned, at 100 bucks to replace, not worth it
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
oops, not very big, pics are off my iphone - sorry
1st pic is the top, fuse side
2nd is bottom connector side, threaded lug is main +12V directly off battery
3rd is side view
 

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Thanks for the pictures - REPS for them.

So the PCB is not encased in an epoxy block - just a conformall coating?

Wish you could have gotten some close-ups of the components.

You mention proprietary chips - many are house numbered standards, but I'm sure some are ASIC's specifically made for Chrysler.

What material is the PCB? (fiberglass or paper)

What is your overall impression of the build quality?
I deal with a lot of industrial electronics - many times better than consumer electronics as far as build quality goes. Where do you think the TIPM PCB's fit within this range.

See any glaring weaknesses in the construction of the unit?
How are the horizontal and vertical PCB interconnected?

I probably have a couple more thousand questions, but we'll save them for later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
bigger pics

ah, thats better, just got the phone and haven't had time to take it apart yet, big pics.

Typical fiberglass pcb, at least 4 layers, all the goodies are on the small board, big voltage doesn't leave the big board, except for parallel traces I guess for monitoring or com channel data. good build quality,no mid production mods, the coating makes it weatherproof so definately a bit more rugged than consumer boards, not a single even questionable solder joint, all perfect with no signs of cooling "pop", very clean work. seems like the smaller board is modular to control/monitor any option possible and probably is used in other cars with a different fuse configuation(that what I would do if i was an automotive power engineer), actually probably used in a lot more vehicles than just dodge, same for the fuse board, a lot of empty spaces.
some LED's would be nice to indicate failure of a circuit, like on TV's, but then it is user serviceable. Love to get a hold of the schematic and input it into my simulator, man I could make a fortune diagnosing online, or a mail in service.
 

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Yeah, definitely on a build level like AC Motor Drives, Industrial Servos, PLC's and HMI's.
Judging from the crystal on the low power board, it may even have its own microprocessor on board!
Another question - where the wiring harness plugs into the "CPU" board, do I see edge connectors or is there some sort of "real" connector there?

Kind of makes you long for the "good old days" when all you needed to turn somethin on or off was a plain old switch.
 

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Doesn't look too bad. I used to repair boards for the Air Force that were conformal coated worse than that. A special solvent is used to soften the coating and then either alcohol or freon degreaser was used to wash it away. Guaranteed, the bad TIPM is sent back for repair and repackaged as a new one.
 

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When I find the chance I will definitly take apart my broken TIPM to see if there are some components burnt on the C1 and C2 connector..

I will also check for differences which are related to the TIPM of a CRD..

Does anybody of you guys knows how exactly to remove this clear coat?

@2007Cali: Thank you!

I hope that this thread won't go down, since here can be a lot of interesting information posted..
 

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Does anybody of you guys knows how exactly to remove this clear coat?
I already described the process in my post. The solvent is expensive and as far as I know, you need a special permit and be a large quantity user to buy it. In other words, you need to be more than a "hobbyist".

On a side note; if you hold a conformal coated board under a black light it glows purple.
 

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Went on "Humiseal's" website (the coating I'm most familiar with).
There are several different types of coatings available, each requiring a specific solvent to remove.
As Brad said, the coatings and solvents are industrial chemicals, available only "to the trade" - no sales to the public whatsoever.
 

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I hope that this thread won't go down, since here can be a lot of interesting information posted..
Only happens if it degenerates into a hostile argument, all our discussions are available for a historic search.
 
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