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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My team put in a bunch of work over the holiday to completely remove the dash and the entire HVAC system. We removed at least 100 pounds of weight and it is much more roomy...

Here it is after the dash was removed:

Motor vehicle Hood Automotive tire Electrical wiring Automotive exterior




And here is the new setup.

Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Automotive tire Automotive design
 

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Bah... copper ain't light.
Cut all that out, too.

What did you eat for breakfast?
If it wasn't "Chocolate Super-Lax," it's possible to loose some weight there.

Is this still within any racing regulations with all the original stuff removed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bah... copper ain't light.
Cut all that out, too.
Good idea!

Actually, there are large parts of the harness unused (HVAC, airbags, radio, etc.) and we've been thinking about cutting those out too.
Is this still within any racing regulations with all the original stuff removed?
Most racing series require most or all of the interior to be removed.

There are only a few series, like autocross and rallycross have classes where you are not allowed to remove the interior.

It is generally safer to completely remove the interior on a car meant for racing. There is reduced fire risk and more room for egress.
 

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Are you concerned with crumple zones on these cars?

I was looking at ones in the junkyard and can't figure out exactly where these zones are, and have no idea how to reinforce the front and back from... crumpling in a hit.
 

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Never seen a back tested, it is the driver/buyer who is assessed. If it is by a car you get their crumpling, if bigger then you are toast.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Are you concerned with crumple zones on these cars?
No concern. Even poorly made modern cars like the Caliber have excellent crumple zone design and overall crash safety.

With a full roll cage, road race containment racing seat, 6 point FIA harness (seat belts), and hans device, (plus helmet and full fire suit) I am extremely well protected when I crash.

I was looking at ones in the junkyard and can't figure out exactly where these zones are
The crumple zones on most cars are everything in front of the front shock/strut towers and everything in back of the rear shock/strut towers.

, and have no idea how to reinforce the front and back from... crumpling in a hit.
You should not do that. The crumple zones are designed to crumple so that they absorb the energy from a crash...if they don't crumple then you are much more likely to be injured.

Take a look at this example of an older car with no crumple zones vs a modern car:

 

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Wow. That video is very convincing. No crumple zones means everything crumples!

I was thinking about the Caliber bouncing off, instead... but, maybe I'll change my mind and just call it a loss (in the interest of safety) in this case.

Thanks.
 

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I'm amazed at how fast those side airbags inflate. POW! - You're safe!

In a front collision, where does the engine go? Under the car? I just realized the almost all the Calibers in the junkyard with front crashes have no engine.

I was thinking someone just took them, but an wondering if they fall off in a crash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
...I just realized the almost all the Calibers in the junkyard with front crashes have no engine.
I think that is because people are pulling the engine in junkyards to get to the transmission. They have a Caliber with a failed CVT and are pulling the CVT from a crashed Caliber in the hope that it is better than the CVT they have in their own Caliber
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So how much dose the caliber weigh now?
We took out a bunch, but we've added the cage...all in I'd say we are at least 250 pounds lighter.

Between the lost weight, stiffer suspension, stiffer body due to roll cage and weight shifted towards center (Due to battery relocation, removing dash, removing HVAC system, etc.), the car handles amazingly well...nimble and fast.
 

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I'm not sure what I'm looking at. But, this is all welded inside the car? Take out all the flammables first?

I've seen cages that are inside stock-looking cars; ie, with dash, carpet, seats, etc. And wondered how cages get into cars.

I guess bolting on steel pipes wouldn't work (for my non-race car).

What's the white paint for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm not sure what I'm looking at. But, this is all welded inside the car? Take out all the flammables first?

I've seen cages that are inside stock-looking cars; ie, with dash, carpet, seats, etc. And wondered how cages get into cars.

I guess bolting on steel pipes wouldn't work (for my non-race car).

What's the white paint for?
Welded joints are rust prone, the paint it to protect them from rust.

The pic above is the passenger footwell, you can just see the door opening.

For race cars, you generally strip the interior and then weld in the cage.

For street cars with occasional track use, you can buy or fabricate a bolt in cage that requires only minimal interior mods.
 
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