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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The sound started the day after I got the oil changed, when I got the car the previous owner used synthetic so I paid for synthetic, took about 2 hours for the oil change and the next morning had this sound, Their insurance company came to look at it but determined it wasn’t their fault, but now I think they might have used an additive or the wrong filter? Any ideas guys?

Here is the video:

 

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That's the pulley driven by the belt.
Unlikely they even touched the belt, you may be just more sensitive to looking over the engine after the work.
It may be more noticeable with the bonnet up or cover off.

Usually this is the decoupler on the alternator with that noise. Recommend just replacing the alternator with an aftermarket one.

Alternately it can sometimes be the tensioner pulley - use the plastic pipe trick to listen for whichever one is louder.

The noise is an indication of a worn bearing, you don't need to do anything but it's best to before something fails at an inopportune time.
 
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I will second Aleks on this for sure. The alternator pulley gets LOUD when it fails.

You need to remove the alternator to replace the pulley, and get a tool to allow you to remove and install the pulley. It's a pain to remove the alternator because the A/C compressor is in the way.

I would recommend replacing the idler and tensioner pulley along with the belt at the same time. They're pretty cheap and will likely fail next anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's the pulley driven by the belt.
Unlikely they even touched the belt, you may be just more sensitive to looking over the engine after the work.
It may be more noticeable with the bonnet up or cover off.

Usually this is the decoupler on the alternator with that noise. Recommend just replacing the alternator with an aftermarket one.

Alternately it can sometimes be the tensioner pulley - use the plastic pipe trick to listen for whichever one is louder.

The noise is an indication of a worn bearing, you don't need to do anything but it's best to before something fails at an inopportune time.
So would it be safe to drive? Or is it at risk of knocking all the other accessory belts off as well? Also heard about using liquid latex maybe to quell the sound? If it is the alternator
 

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There is only one drive belt these days. The noise is friction which is also heat so it won't last very long. You have time to shop around for a new alternator, tensioner, and belt.
When the alternator stops turning your dash light will illuminate and battery start draining. Shortly after you will be stranded. Don't know of this latex and masking symptoms is not recommended. Isn't that like tape over warning lights?
 

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The one thing I'll throw into this conversation is that if it IS the decoupling pulley on the alternator, do yourself a favor and just buy a name-brand alternator (like a Denso or a Mopar) and just replace the whole thing. It's a PITA to get the alternator out on these cars and the cheap remanufactured alternators you get a the national chain auto parts stores are garbage. You don't want to do this job more than once.
 

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Is it safe to keep driving until you get the chance to do it? Most likely. I drove mine for hundreds of KM's before fixing (Cousin's wedding 4 hours away). Also had to wait for the parts to come in.

Can you just ignore it forever without repercussions? No. Best case, the alternator stops working. Worst case the belt pops off...

While removing the alternator is a big PITA, all in a this is one of those better things to fix. Most of the parts needed (except the alternator, should you choose to replace it) are fairly cheap, these parts tend not to be rusty, and a set of wrenches and jack + jackstands is all that's needed to do the job.

Never heard of this liquid latex fix, but it sounds like a bad idea. You'd need to have the alternator removed to get any meaningful access to the pulley anyway, and by then there's no reason to not replace either the alternator decoupler pulley or the whole alternator.
 
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