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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2009 Caliber has pulled to the left since day one. I have had it at the dealer for an alignment and they said it was off slightly and supposedly corrected it, but it made no difference. If I'm on the local two lane divided highway in the right hand lane, it will pull right over the crown in the road and into the left lane. Pain in the butt to hold on to it when travelling for a couple of hours or more.

I have heard of some rear suspension issues and such. Do you think any of that could cause my problem? Any TSB's on this?

I now have 6,000miles on it. The tires don't seem to be wearing unevenly, although there is visible wear when compared to the rear.
 

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Are your tire pressures more or less equal all the way around? Most of us run about 35 psig in all four tires.
 

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If I was you, I'd take it to a suspension shop for an inspection. It may cost you to have it done, but you can then go back to the dealer with the ammunition to get the problem fixed once and for all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
DKazoroski: The car came with 32psi of nitrogen all the way around, but I wanted a bit more. I asked the dealer to put 35psi in all the tires (since thay had the nitrogen) and they gave me a big hassel about it being over the pressure on the door jam. I finally convinced them to put the 35 psi in. The pressues are even all around.

Prop 1: I will follow your advice and bring it to a shop that can check the suspension and do another four wheel alignment. I doubt they even touched the alignment as the tech was upset with me after I argued with him about the tire pressures. I just wondered if there were any TSB's that might cause this. I'll post my results.

Thanks guys.
 

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DKazoroski: The car came with 32psi of nitrogen all the way around, but I wanted a bit more. I asked the dealer to put 35psi in all the tires (since thay had the nitrogen) and they gave me a big hassel about it being over the pressure on the door jam. I finally convinced them to put the 35 psi in. The pressues are even all around.

Prop 1: I will follow your advice and bring it to a shop that can check the suspension and do another four wheel alignment. I doubt they even touched the alignment as the tech was upset with me after I argued with him about the tire pressures. I just wondered if there were any TSB's that might cause this. I'll post my results.

Thanks guys.
There are a couple RRTs and a TSB for suspension related issues, hard to say if your issue is related. http://www.caliberforumz.com/forumdisplay.php?f=115
 

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you know what? i have the same problem for my 07 dodge caliber. really shows itself on the highway, not so much on the road. i've had it aligned by the dealer already. and then i went to an alignment shop and the guy said that it might be because of how the roads are made? if you're on the highway on the left lane you'll slant to the left, and right lane slant to the right. so i actually tried it out when i went to d.c and it was true! i don't know if that's normal, but it was like that for me.
 

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Hay guys i'm the front end guy at a Goodyear here in Ontario, I do tons of alignments and if I were you I would take it to a shop known for springs/alignments. There are 3 angles to an alignment. Toe wears the tires the most, camber will if it's usually more than a degree, caster wont and is usally non adjustable. Camber however will cause a pull and not wear the tires very noticeably. A lot of alignment techs at the dealers just "Set the toe and let it go" Also there is no camber adjustments on our cars from factory you may need them to get a front camber kit. I bet your camber is out a bit and since there is no adjustment with out the kit they just set the toe. Also always ask to see the print out to see what is out and what they fixed.

Hope this helps.
C-YA!
 

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i went to an alignment shop and the guy said that it might be because of how the roads are made? if you're on the highway on the left lane you'll slant to the left, and right lane slant to the right. so i actually tried it out when i went to d.c and it was true! i don't know if that's normal, but it was like that for me.
This is perfectly normal. Most roads are built in suh a way as to allow water to flow off of the road, as opposed to letting it pool up in puddles. Its like that mainly for saftey and maintence reasons.

As TheCoonHound was saying there are 3 main alignment angles. Wheel Caster, as stated, is almost always non-adjustable but is mostly likely to make the kind of "pull" your talking about occur. Most cars are designed with a positive caster, meaning the car is more likey to track straight, as oppsed to weave and wander. The closer a vehicles caster angle is to 0, or to the negatives, means its is more likely to follow the curvature of the road or weave and wander. The main disadvantage to positive caster, is increased steering effort, but we have power-steering for that. :D

Having said that, I have no clue what the caster anlge is on the caliber. But to my knowledge most manufacturers keep it just postive enough to make the car track straight better, but low enough to make it easy to steer.

Anyway, thats why your car sometimes pulls left on the left side of the road, and right on the right side of the road. :D
 

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This is perfectly normal. Most roads are built in suh a way as to allow water to flow off of the road, as opposed to letting it pool up in puddles. Its like that mainly for saftey and maintence reasons.
That's called a crown - higher in the middle than on the sides - to get water to flow off into the gutter. Very common around here to help prevent winter icing.
Some roads are crowned more than others. When you are on a steeply crowned road, the force of gravity tends to try to push the car down the slope. Combine the force of gravity and the forward motion of the car (vector addition), the car will always try to drift to the low side.

This has fooled the best of us into thinking there may be an alignment problem.
Best thing to do is go to a large flat parking lot during the off hours and see how the car handles on level ground.
 

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Gotta love this forum with guys like TheCoonHound chiming in. A dude who actually does alignments.

IMHO the particular road you are on has a lot to do with how the 'pull' feels. They can't set your alignment to work with all roads.
 

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That's called a crown - higher in the middle than on the sides - to get water to flow off into the gutter. Very common around here to help prevent winter icing.
Some roads are crowned more than others. When you are on a steeply crowned road, the force of gravity tends to try to push the car down the slope. Combine the force of gravity and the forward motion of the car (vector addition), the car will always try to drift to the low side.

This has fooled the best of us into thinking there may be an alignment problem.
Best thing to do is go to a large flat parking lot during the off hours and see how the car handles on level ground.
This may have fooled me as well. I recently took black panther to Pep Boys to have her alignment done for drifting to the right. Never thought of the parking lot test.:doh:
 
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